Hey there! I'm Jas. I'm fond of books and coffee and writing and art and things that are intriguing. I usually follow back - and please don't be afraid to send an ask (I really don't bite!). I wish you the best in all of your endeavours.

tooleztofunction:

This scene was brilliant perfect amazing written by Jesus.

freerangeraspberries:

alishalovescats1701:

sixpenceee:

sixpenceee:

problemedic:

plightofthevalkyries:

sixpenceee:

deucelooselyproductions:

sixpenceee:

The aim of this study was to test the hypothesis that psychiatrists cannot reliably tell the difference between people who are mentally stable and those who are mentally unstable.

In 1970, 8 mentally stable people were granted admission into 12 different hospitals. They all told the same story of how they would hear a voice inside their head, it was unclear but often said “empty”, “hollow” and “thud”. 

Right after they were admitted, the patients stopped showing any signs of abnormality. They took part in activities and talked to faculty and other patients as they would normally. 

None of the psychiatrists ever stopped to say “I think they are getting better” or “they seem absolutely fine now” In fact, nurses and psychiatrists took normal activity such as walking or writing and attempted to represent it as a form of pathological behavior. 

For example, staff would point to patients waiting outside the lunchroom as a form of oral-acquisitive syndrome, when really they were just bored and were anticipating their meal. 

It’s interesting to note that even though staff didn’t recognize that these people were completely fine, patients recognized that they didn’t seem to have any problems.

This study highlights how powerful labels can be.

SOURCE & MORE INFORMATION

EVIL EXPERIMENT

Wow…this also potentially bespeaks how the people who are charged with making these patients better are only trying to create terminology and atmosphere that keep them institutionalized.
That’s pretty disturbing.

To anyone saying “well they said they heard voices obviously the doctors are going to look at them with a weary eye”

You missed the point.

They were supposed to detect the patients getting better and instead of being able to tell that, they took any action that the patients performed and totally distorted it and blew it to epic proportions to make them seem completely and utterly abnormal to a point where the patients were institutionalized for months. 

Also, sixpenceee, you missed the second part to this experiment - equally chilling, in my opinion. One hospital’s administration was angered by Rosenhan’s experiment, and challenged him to send impostor patients - mentally stable people masquerading as mentally unstable people - to their facilities. Their staff would then turn those pseudopatients away. Long story short, Rosenhan OK’d this part of the experiment. 193 people went to that hospital in that experiment period looking for help. They flagged 41 people as impostors and had doubts about another 42.

Rosenhan sent no one.

The staff of this hospital flagged impostor patients where none had existed.

That’s really worrying…

This is terrifying 

This was conducted in 1970, so I wonder how much has changed since then

im really interested to know…id like to think psychiatry has improved and advanced beyond this

It hasn’t

norhuu:

Encrypted Murader’s Map
For my cryptology course final I made the Murader’s Map. I used maze construct theory to design the interior, and the variations of the interior, then scrambled the different versions on folding tabs so that unless they are folded in precisely the correct sequence of left or right the map is confusing and useless. The sequence for reavealing the correct map is the binary code for a hash function of “I solemnly swear that I am up to no good’.

College. Heh.

sophielostandfound:

tartapplesauce:

illustrate-her:

A message to you today from Artemisia Gentileschi, kick-arse 17th Century feminist artist.

Oh hell yes.  For those of you who don’t know (a) the story of Artemisia Gentileschi (b) the subject matter of her painting, let me give you a quick heads-up.
First, the topic of the picture is “Susanna and the Elders”.  It’s a story from the Book of Daniel, Old Testament, the Bible.
A beautiful young married woman, Susanna, is having a bath in her own garden.  She sends all her maids away for some privacy.  Two Elders (and these are supposed to be respectable older men, the pillars of society in both religion and secular leadership) are spying on her.  They threaten Susanna that, unless she agrees to have sex with them, they’ll spread a false story that she was meeting a young man on the sly.
Now, the point of the story is this: Susanna is a married woman.  If she’s accused of adultery, she will be sentenced to death.  The two elders know they can get away with this, because they’re respectable leaders of society and who is going to be believed: them or the woman?
Susanna refuses to be blackmailed into sex, and sure enough they carry out their threat.  Susanna is only saved when a young man named Daniel interrupts the trial, says that the two men should be questioned separately, and he cleverly picks out the flaws in their testimony to prove they are lying and she is innocent.
Now, for the artist: Artemisia Gentileschi was a 17th century Roman woman, the eldest child of a painter who, unusually, encouraged and trained his daughter to be an artist as well as his sons (and she was better than her brothers).
Her father was working with another painter whom he also hired to tutor Artemisia.  This guy raped her, but they continued to have a sexual relationship with the promise of marriage (this was because marriage was the only hope she had of keeping her reputation).  Well, being a sleazeball, he never followed through on the promise of marriage and so her father took him to court.
Artemisia also supported the charge of rape, and while maintaining her testimony that she had been a virgin before being seduced/raped, she was subjected to torture by thumbscrews - this was standard practice to make sure witnesses/plaintiffs were telling the truth, but of course, it was important that she was tortured to make sure she wasn’t lying about him because she was a jilted vindictive woman, but he wasn’t tortured to make sure he wasn’t lying about being a rapist.  Same old, same old, yes?
The point of this little history lesson?  From the second century B.C. (the setting of Susanna’s story) to the 17th century to today, men have tricked, lied, bullied and threatened women with death if they didn’t have sex with them; treated them as whores and sluts if they did have sex with them, and the whole of society was stacked in favour of the men and not the women.
It’s not “one mentally disturbed young man” that’s the problem.
It’s the whole bloody attitude of entitlement: that women exist only and mainly as sexual property for men.

she also famously did a painting of judith slaying holofernes, with herself as judith and her rapist as holofernes.

sophielostandfound:

tartapplesauce:

illustrate-her:

A message to you today from Artemisia Gentileschi, kick-arse 17th Century feminist artist.

Oh hell yes.  For those of you who don’t know (a) the story of Artemisia Gentileschi (b) the subject matter of her painting, let me give you a quick heads-up.

First, the topic of the picture is “Susanna and the Elders”.  It’s a story from the Book of Daniel, Old Testament, the Bible.

A beautiful young married woman, Susanna, is having a bath in her own garden.  She sends all her maids away for some privacy.  Two Elders (and these are supposed to be respectable older men, the pillars of society in both religion and secular leadership) are spying on her.  They threaten Susanna that, unless she agrees to have sex with them, they’ll spread a false story that she was meeting a young man on the sly.

Now, the point of the story is this: Susanna is a married woman.  If she’s accused of adultery, she will be sentenced to death.  The two elders know they can get away with this, because they’re respectable leaders of society and who is going to be believed: them or the woman?

Susanna refuses to be blackmailed into sex, and sure enough they carry out their threat.  Susanna is only saved when a young man named Daniel interrupts the trial, says that the two men should be questioned separately, and he cleverly picks out the flaws in their testimony to prove they are lying and she is innocent.

Now, for the artist: Artemisia Gentileschi was a 17th century Roman woman, the eldest child of a painter who, unusually, encouraged and trained his daughter to be an artist as well as his sons (and she was better than her brothers).

Her father was working with another painter whom he also hired to tutor Artemisia.  This guy raped her, but they continued to have a sexual relationship with the promise of marriage (this was because marriage was the only hope she had of keeping her reputation).  Well, being a sleazeball, he never followed through on the promise of marriage and so her father took him to court.

Artemisia also supported the charge of rape, and while maintaining her testimony that she had been a virgin before being seduced/raped, she was subjected to torture by thumbscrews - this was standard practice to make sure witnesses/plaintiffs were telling the truth, but of course, it was important that she was tortured to make sure she wasn’t lying about him because she was a jilted vindictive woman, but he wasn’t tortured to make sure he wasn’t lying about being a rapist.  Same old, same old, yes?

The point of this little history lesson?  From the second century B.C. (the setting of Susanna’s story) to the 17th century to today, men have tricked, lied, bullied and threatened women with death if they didn’t have sex with them; treated them as whores and sluts if they did have sex with them, and the whole of society was stacked in favour of the men and not the women.

It’s not “one mentally disturbed young man” that’s the problem.

It’s the whole bloody attitude of entitlement: that women exist only and mainly as sexual property for men.

she also famously did a painting of judith slaying holofernes, with herself as judith and her rapist as holofernes.

nivalingreenhow:

when McGonagall finds out that Ginny is pregnant, and that the Weasley and Potter bloodlines will converge, she marks on her calender the day the child will turn 11 and that is the day she retires 

pajamaben:

GIRLS DONT READ this ones just for the fellas. only guys will get this one. bros you know when youre at the gym workin on your ‘toids to get big for the sports well OKAY I’m sure the ladies have stopped reading by now, so what’s their deal? how do I tell the girls I love them without having to talk? I’m scared

theodorepython:

maxistentialist:

Tweenbots by Kacie Kinzer:

Given their extreme vulnerability, the vastness of city space, the dangers posed by traffic, suspicion of terrorism, and the possibility that no one would be interested in helping a lost little robot, I initially conceived the Tweenbots as disposable creatures which were more likely to struggle and die in the city than to reach their destination. Because I built them with minimal technology, I had no way of tracking the Tweenbot’s progress, and so I set out on the first test with a video camera hidden in my purse. I placed the Tweenbot down on the sidewalk, and walked far enough away that I would not be observed as the Tweenbot––a smiling 10-inch tall cardboard missionary––bumped along towards his inevitable fate.
The results were unexpected. Over the course of the following months, throughout numerous missions, the Tweenbots were successful in rolling from their start point to their far-away destination assisted only by strangers. Every time the robot got caught under a park bench, ground futilely against a curb, or became trapped in a pothole, some passerby would always rescue it and send it toward its goal. Never once was a Tweenbot lost or damaged. Often, people would ignore the instructions to aim the Tweenbot in the “right” direction, if that direction meant sending the robot into a perilous situation. One man turned the robot back in the direction from which it had just come, saying out loud to the Tweenbot, “You can’t go that way, it’s toward the road.”
The Tweenbot’s unexpected presence in the city created an unfolding narrative that spoke not simply to the vastness of city space and to the journey of a human-assisted robot, but also to the power of a simple technological object to create a complex network powered by human intelligence and asynchronous interactions. But of more interest to me, was the fact that this ad-hoc crowdsourcing was driven primarily by human empathy for an anthropomorphized object. The journey the Tweenbots take each time they are released in the city becomes a story of people’s willingness to engage with a creature that mirrors human characteristics of vulnerability, of being lost, and of having intention without the means of achieving its goal alone. As each encounter with a helpful pedestrian takes the robot one step closer to attaining it’s destination, the significance of our random discoveries and individual actions accumulates into a story about a vast space made small by an even smaller robot.


Man this is still one of my favorite little social projects/experiments.

theodorepython:

maxistentialist:

Tweenbots by Kacie Kinzer:

Given their extreme vulnerability, the vastness of city space, the dangers posed by traffic, suspicion of terrorism, and the possibility that no one would be interested in helping a lost little robot, I initially conceived the Tweenbots as disposable creatures which were more likely to struggle and die in the city than to reach their destination. Because I built them with minimal technology, I had no way of tracking the Tweenbot’s progress, and so I set out on the first test with a video camera hidden in my purse. I placed the Tweenbot down on the sidewalk, and walked far enough away that I would not be observed as the Tweenbot––a smiling 10-inch tall cardboard missionary––bumped along towards his inevitable fate.

The results were unexpected. Over the course of the following months, throughout numerous missions, the Tweenbots were successful in rolling from their start point to their far-away destination assisted only by strangers. Every time the robot got caught under a park bench, ground futilely against a curb, or became trapped in a pothole, some passerby would always rescue it and send it toward its goal. Never once was a Tweenbot lost or damaged. Often, people would ignore the instructions to aim the Tweenbot in the “right” direction, if that direction meant sending the robot into a perilous situation. One man turned the robot back in the direction from which it had just come, saying out loud to the Tweenbot, “You can’t go that way, it’s toward the road.”

The Tweenbot’s unexpected presence in the city created an unfolding narrative that spoke not simply to the vastness of city space and to the journey of a human-assisted robot, but also to the power of a simple technological object to create a complex network powered by human intelligence and asynchronous interactions. But of more interest to me, was the fact that this ad-hoc crowdsourcing was driven primarily by human empathy for an anthropomorphized object. The journey the Tweenbots take each time they are released in the city becomes a story of people’s willingness to engage with a creature that mirrors human characteristics of vulnerability, of being lost, and of having intention without the means of achieving its goal alone. As each encounter with a helpful pedestrian takes the robot one step closer to attaining it’s destination, the significance of our random discoveries and individual actions accumulates into a story about a vast space made small by an even smaller robot.

Man this is still one of my favorite little social projects/experiments.

dontpanic-therecklessandthebrave:


Grease, 1978

Can I just get a hell yeah for the fact that Grease literally took the femininity associated with the colour pink and destroyed it with Rizzo. Is Riz a Pink Lady, with the silk jacket and everything? Yes. Does she wear lipstick like a fierce bitch? Yes. Does she have that “I don’t give a fuck” attitude that strikes fear into the hearts of men as they know they wouldn’t be able to handle how badass she is? Hell yes. Does she still get emotional and show that it’s okay to feel upset at things in life? You betcha!
Riz wears pink and heels and is 100% not afraid to whoop your ass in a bitch match. Girly girl my ass. She’s tougher than the T-Birds and she is damn proud.

dontpanic-therecklessandthebrave:

Grease, 1978

Can I just get a hell yeah for the fact that Grease literally took the femininity associated with the colour pink and destroyed it with Rizzo. Is Riz a Pink Lady, with the silk jacket and everything? Yes. Does she wear lipstick like a fierce bitch? Yes. Does she have that “I don’t give a fuck” attitude that strikes fear into the hearts of men as they know they wouldn’t be able to handle how badass she is? Hell yes. Does she still get emotional and show that it’s okay to feel upset at things in life? You betcha!

Riz wears pink and heels and is 100% not afraid to whoop your ass in a bitch match. Girly girl my ass. She’s tougher than the T-Birds and she is damn proud.